Resin

Resin art uses a mix of a fluid chemical known as epoxy resin with a variety of colour pigments and additives. It’s typically used by sculptors.

Resin serves as a robust and resilient medium, providing a lustrous and protective finish that enables the creation of diverse artistic effects. Epoxy resin finds widespread application in the art world, effectively sealing various works such as drawings, watercolours, alcohol ink creations, mixed media pieces, oil paintings, and photographs. The result is a stunning, highly reflective, and ultra-glossy protective varnish.

The tradition of resin art spans centuries. Nature's own resin, commonly known as amber, is naturally produced by trees and undergoes fossilisation to form a solid, transparent slab. Throughout history, amber has been used for centuries as both decorative ornaments and jewellery pieces.

50 results found for "Resin"

video

Chris Ofili

Chris Ofili rose to fame in the late ‘80s as a figurehead of the Young British Artists. He was the first Black artist to win the Turner Prize, and throughout his career, his art has challenged and changed perceptions in the art world and beyond.

Chris Ofili
guide

What is silkscreen printing?

An expert printmaker takes a break from crafting world class editions at Make-Ready to guide us through the fundamentals, foibles and speculative future of screen printing and serigraphy.

What is silkscreen printing?
article

Curated by Julian Schnabel

Palazzo-dwelling painter and filmmaker Julian Schnabel is back. This time, with a selection of original works by artists from his own collection.

Curated by Julian Schnabel
Artist

Jang Koal

Jang Koal (she/her) was born in 1989 in Ulsan, South Korea. She now lives and works in Seoul, South Korea.

Jang Koal
Artist

Julian Schnabel

Julian Schnabel (he/him) was born 1951 in Brooklyn, New York. He now lives and works between his New York City home Palazzo Chupi and Montauk, Long Island.

Julian Schnabel
Sculpture

Open the Right Mind

Johnson Tsang invites us to open our minds with a surreal wall-hanging.Two porcelain hands pull a head wide apart, creating a space for collectors' imaginations to fill. Tsang modelled the original sculpture before a major life change. This experience, he reflects, offered the opportunity to learn and grow – opening his mind to understand that life endures both miracles and obstacles."Fortunately, I have an open mind and accept what life has to offer me, so I don’t miss out on any experiences. Fortunately, I have chosen the right attitude that allows me to understand that everything happens for my own good. Fortunately, I finished this piece just before I suffered the stroke, so that it can be displayed before you. Fortunately, I opened the right mind and became aware of being truly alive like never before."

Open the Right Mind
Sculpture

Home Globe (Pink)

Richard Woods constructs a wintery micro climate for his archetypal home.Woods is drawn to the motif of the house, representing security and the human desire to build and make. Stemming from his time working as a builder and carpenter before becoming an artist, Woods reduces architecture down to the very basics. His original series of holiday home installations were stylistically built as if drawn by a child, rendered in block colour.Re-imagined in miniature as a snow globe, the edition is designed to be tilted and shaken, building upon the ‘hands on’ interaction that is integral to Wood’s artworks. In the pink edition, snow cascades around a bubblegum pink facade and inviting blue door.“I think of the snow globe as a device for miniaturising or reducing an architectural scene. To reduce or miniaturise an object that is already reductive creates an interesting narrative .”

Home Globe (Pink)
Sculpture

Home Globe (Yellow)

Richard Woods constructs a wintery micro climate for his archetypal home.Woods is drawn to the motif of the house, representing security and the human desire to build and make. Stemming from his time working as a builder and carpenter before becoming an artist, Woods reduces architecture down to the very basics. His original series of holiday home installations were stylistically built as if drawn by a child, rendered in block colour.Re-imagined in miniature as a snow globe, the edition is designed to be tilted and shaken, building upon the ‘hands on’ interaction that is integral to Wood’s artworks. In the yellow edition, snow cascades around a yellow facade and inviting pink door.“I think of the snow globe as a device for miniaturising or reducing an architectural scene. To reduce or miniaturise an object that is already reductive creates an interesting narrative .”

Home Globe (Yellow)
Artist

Lina Iris Viktor

Lina Iris Viktor was raised in the UK by Liberian parents, and now divides her time between London and Italy.

Lina Iris Viktor
Artist

Angel Otero

Angel Otero (he/him) was born in 1981 in Santurce, Puerto Rico. He now splits his time between the island and his studio in New York City.

Angel Otero
Sculpture

Soul to Soul

Johnson Tsang portrays the forces of love with a diptych of kissing sculptures.The surreal emotions associated with love are depicted through the pair of wall hanging sculptures; two characters’ souls connecting to create one work. Their outward looking facial expressions represent the joy and peace associated with love, whilst the two connected souls show the physicality of human attraction. Tsang reflects that no matter how long we live, we will always need love to find happiness and peace, in the same way that we require oxygen to survive.“There is only one place in the world where we can find peace, and that is our soul. And the soul needs nutrients to grow, and that is love.”

Soul to Soul
Sculpture

Blockade Line

Blockade Line emerged from a meditative dream, disrupted by the stifling reality of the political turmoil in Tsang's home country. The wall-mounted sculpture portrays a face distorted and constricted by a red rope. The artist reinforces that amongst restrictions, artistic creation remains a free process. He hopes for Blockade Line to hold power outside of this specific scenario, connecting to the visceral human emotion felt universally in our own lives.“Suddenly I was disturbed by a strong sense of oppression. Like throwing a big stone on a silent lake, causing huge waves. At this moment, I saw that I was tied up, and the ropes were tightly wrapped around all parts of my body. I couldn't move, talk, or even breathe.”

Blockade Line
Sculpture

Children of this Planet #38

Hikari Shimoda unites fantasy and reality in a starry-eyed dichroic sculpture.With her art, Shimoda searches for a deeper understanding of our chaotic world. Anonymous subjects from her portrait series Children of this Planet cannot be defined by their skin colour or environment. Similarly, an edition of dichroic sculptures with a surface imitating vivid glass elude one specific form or colour.Emotion is held within the subject's sparkling eyes, while a pair of horns represent the fury and despair felt on Earth. Through its transparency, the work becomes a mirror of its viewer – allowing anyone to imagine themselves within it.

Children of this Planet #38
Sculpture

Umma

Jang Koal leans on ancient associations of the female and the feline to create Umma.Umma, Korean for Mother, is a sculptural interpretation of the artist’s original painting ‘Mother of Cats’. A glossy female figure reclines nude, complimenting Koal’s elegant graphic language. She is surrounded by hand-painted bronze cats – the black symbolises protection, the white feeds from one of her six teats. This vision of harmony between feline and human implies that we are not as different as we seem.

Umma
Sculpture

TOUCHED//

With his first edition of sculptures, Fvckrender finds physical form for an abstract self.Canadian artist Fvckrender combines a surreal, symbol-laden mode of autobiography and a fascination with the behaviour of light to create hyperreal digital artworks. Fittingly, TOUCHED// envelops the composition of SELF_HELP// – an earlier NFT work which documented the artist tackling a personal crisis with methodical perseverance – in a glistening chameleon finish. A trio of outstretched hands impart a soothing influence on the face they reach towards.“Art is a way to clear my mind. It's a way to celebrate the wins and leave behind the losses.”

After launch, collectors of TOUCHED// will be invited to claim a corresponding NFT.

TOUCHED//
Sculpture

FEEL//

With his first edition of sculptures, Fvckrender finds physical form for an abstract self.Canadian artist Fvckrender combines a surreal, symbol-laden mode of autobiography and a fascination with the behaviour of light to create hyperreal digital artworks. Fittingly, FEEL// envelops the composition of SELF_HELP// – an earlier NFT work which documented the artist tackling a personal crisis with methodical perseverance – in a lustrous opal finish. A trio of outstretched hands impart a soothing influence on the face they reach towards.“Art is a way to clear my mind. It's a way to celebrate the wins and leave behind the losses.”

FEEL//
Print

The Swedish House 10

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 10
Print

The Swedish House 09

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 09
Print

The Swedish House 06

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 06
Print

The Swedish House 05

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 05
Print

The Swedish House 07

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 07
Print

The Swedish House 03

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 03
Print

The Swedish House 02

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 02
Print

The Swedish House 01

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 01
Print

The Swedish House 04

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 04
Print

The Swedish House 08

Across a series of 10 hand-finished prints, Julian Schnabel uses energetic interjections to connect an idyllic vignette with the here and now. The Swedish House takes its name and subject from a trio of recent paintings based, unusually for the artist, on a photograph. Specifically, a photograph of a small house in rural Sweden. Taken by his brother in law, the postcard-picturesque image appealed to Schnabel’s poetic disposition – “a cliché of the perfect place.”In each print a white oil paint mark punctuates the scene below, while a hand-poured layer of resin lends a glass-like finish. The gestural marks, a recurring motif throughout Schnabel’s practice, connect the artworks with the present moment. “It says that something's not finished, that we're transients – and there's something that goes beyond the edge.”

The Swedish House 08
Sculpture

Searching for Spring

Traditional Chinese techniques meet modern-day anxieties in Johnson Tsang’s uncanny wall hanging Searching for Spring.Tsang reminds us that we should simply do our best instead of tearing ourselves up in the pursuit of the good things in life. Spring symbolises the chance for a break after the hardship of winter.“If we have faith and positivity through the bad times, the good times will finally come afterwards.”

Searching for Spring
Sculpture

The Observer

Wry social critique prevails in the expansive oeuvre of Danish-Norweigan duo Elmgreen & Dragset.Our second collaboration, The Observer, sets an ambiguous shirtless figure on an exposed balcony – loosely paralleling states of undress with arbitrary divisions of public and private space, all while prompting the viewer’s own contemplation.“As you encounter the sculpture and look at it, you will notice that it is looking back at you as well. What is he thinking?”

The Observer
Sculpture

Dance For Me In The Dusk

Dance For Me in The Dusk follows The Sinner at Dusk as our second collaboration with poodle-peddling artist Susumu Kamijo.Translating the boldly fragmented geometry of his painting into a wall-mounted wooden sculpture, the first of its kind by the artist, the work balances the glamour of Kamijo’s canine muse with his penchant for darkly ambiguous narratives. In this respect, the instruction to dance for, rather than with, is very much deliberate.

Dance For Me In The Dusk
Sculpture

Polaris

Frédéric Platéus balances high art and pop culture into succinct yet daring design.

Polaris, a stainless steel sculpture edition of 50, combines painted urethane resin with a mirror finish.

Polaris
Sculpture

The Advantage 05

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 05
Sculpture

The Advantage 04

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 04
Sculpture

The Advantage 03

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 03
Sculpture

The Advantage 02

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 02
Sculpture

The Advantage 01

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 01
Sculpture

The Advantage 24

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 24
Sculpture

The Advantage 15

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 15
Sculpture

The Advantage 25

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 25
Sculpture

The Advantage 14

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 14
Sculpture

The Advantage 23

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 23
Sculpture

The Advantage 22

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 22
Sculpture

The Advantage 21

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier next year in Lyon, France.

The Advantage 21
Sculpture

The Advantage 19

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 19
Sculpture

The Advantage 18

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 18
Sculpture

The Advantage 16

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 16
Sculpture

The Advantage 13

Swedish duo Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg animate fantastical forays of shame and desire.The Advantage, a series of 25, touches on recurring themes from Djurberg and Berg’s practice: metamorphosis, guilt and deceit. Treacherous yet disarmingly hopeful, the crocodile pursues an upper hand, using a wig as its disguise. In the artists’ words, the series “takes something considered ugly and adds something more, which turns out not beautiful either, and then finds the beauty (and sweetness) in the innocence of that act.”The work is drawn from a series of animations and sculptures titled Only for the wicked, scheduled to premier in Lyon, France, in 2022.

The Advantage 13

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Parra's studio, with Parra at the centre, his back to the camera as he works on the large painting takes centre stage, showing a faceless blue woman in a striped dress, painted in red, purple, blue and teal. The studio is full of brightly coloured paints, with a large window on the right and a patterned rug across the floor under the painting.